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Venezuela Flag

Venezuela Flag

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Our Venezuela flags are produced in the traditional 2:1 ratio used for National flags in the UK so this flag will match others of the same size if you are flying several flags together. We use a MOD grade Knitted Polyester which has been tested for its durability and suitability for production of flags.

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Our flags are manufactured to the highest standards. We offer flags in a choice of two materials, Hand Made National Flags, and Digitally Printed National Flags

 

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History of the Venezuela Flag

Where in the world?
Trivia
The flag is similar to the flags of Colombia, Ecuador and the Federal Territory of Malaysia.
Technical Specifications
Adopted12th March 2006
Proportion2:3
DesignA yellow, blue and red horizontal tricolour with an arch of eight five-pointed white stars.
Colours
PMSYellow:102Blue:293Red:032Green:355
Brief History

The first flag flown in the area that was to become Venezuela was the Cross of Burgundy used as the flag of the Viceroyalty of Peru and then New Kingdom of Granada under the Spanish Empire from the 16th century.

In 1717 the Spanish Colony was renamed the Viceroyalty of New Granada. The red-yellow-red Spanish national flag with crowed oval featuring a gold tower and red lion was adopted. The Flag remained the same when in 1777 the area was given more freedom from Spanish Control and renamed the Captaincy General of Venezuela.

In 1811 Venezuela claimed independence from Spain to become what is now known as the First Republic of Venezuela. A new ‘mother’ flag was adopted. It is a yellow-blue-red tricolour with an image of and Indian female holding a lance with Phrygian cap sits on mound looking at a sunset.

A second republic was declared in 1813 after a civil war ended with a royalist defeat. A new flag featuring a plain red field with a white diamond and black rectangle was adopted. The republic ended a year later.

The third Republic of Venezuela was established in 1817. A new flag featuring a yellow-dark blue-red horizontal tricolour with seven five-pointed blue stars in the yellow band was adopted.

In 1819 Venezuela joined with New Granada to form Gran Columbia. The flag took its design from the first flag of the Republic of Venezuela. It featured a yellow-light blue-red horizontal tricolour with a shield depicting the Indian woman sat looking at a sunset.

The shield on the flag was changed to feature the arms of Cundiamarca, featuring a condor holding a sword and rose, in 1820.

Venezuela officially gained independence from Spain as part of Gran Colombia in 1821 and the horizontal tricolour flag gained a new coat of arms. The Coat of Arms was a blue disk with white border and laurel wreath, at the centre were two horns of plenty, axe in front of a bow and arrows.

In 1822 the coat of arms was replaced with red-yellow-blue shield featuring a horse and broken staph and three stars surrounded by an Ornico, Magdalana and a bird. The Stars on the flag increased to six, nine and then twelve until Venezuela broke apart from Gran Colombia in 1830.

The new flag of an independent Venezuela, officially called the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, was a yellow-blue-red horizontal tricolour with a yellow white-bordered oval emblem with a fasces and axe at the centre surrounded by horns of plenty with a black star above and a bow below.

In 1836 a new coat of arms was adopted featuring a shield split into three, with the red portion featuring a wheat, yellow portion featuring a sword, sabre and three lances and a blue portion featuring a white horse. The shield is held up by an olive branch and palm, above are two horns of plenty and below is a banner. The coat of arms was placed in the top left corner of a yellow-dark blue-red horizontal tricolour flag.

In 1859 the coat of arms was replaced with seven five-pointed blue stars representing the provinces that made up the nation in 1811.

In the same year thirteen extra stars were added to the flag to represent all the states of Venezuela. The seven white stars were added back into the flag in 1863, they were placed in a circle with a star in the centre preplaced the previous 20 blue stars.

In 1905 the star was removed from inside and placed next to the other six stars that create the circle. The seven white five-pointed Stars were positioned into an arch in 1930.

In 1954 the coat of arms was added to the top left corner of the flag. Then in 2006 an eight star was added and the coat of arms was removed. The state/war/naval flag retained the coat of arms.

The Coat of Arms of Venezuela

The Coat of Arms of Venezuela was originally adopted in 1836 and updated in 1954 and 2006.

A shield split into three, with the red portion featuring a 20 headed wheat, yellow portion featuring a sword, sabre and three lances and a blue portion featuring a white horse. The shield is held up by an olive branch and palm, above are two horns of plenty and below is a banner.

The Presidential Standards of Venezuela

The Presidential Standard of Venezuela features the coat of arms on a yellow field. When at sea the standard is a blue field with a white five-pointed star in each corner.

The Flag of the Army of Venezuela

The Flag of the Army of Venezuela is a gold fringed blue field with thick red diagonal stripe with a crowned shield protecting a crossed gun, staph and blue and red banner.

The Flags of the States of Venezuela

Each state of Venezuela is represented by a different flag. Below are some examples of the flags.

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